Categorized | Automotive news, National, Silly or odd news

Corvettes discover new underground cavern in Kentucky

OK, had to go with something a little different for the headline since “Sinkhole swallows eight Corvettes” has been used all day.

If you’re not aware of what happened today, here’s a little background: Among famous sites in Kentucky (besides Churchill Downs, various bourbon producers, Mammoth Cave National Park) is the National Corvette MuseumVettes sinkhole

Which last night added an underground cavern – well, actually a sinkhole – that also managed to swallow some priceless Corvettes.

More from AP:

A gaping sinkhole collapsed part of the National Corvette Museum in Kentucky on Wednesday, damaging eight prized cars that plunged in a heap while the attraction geared to the classic American sports car was closed to visitors.

“They’re all just kind of nose down in the bottom of the hole,” said Western Kentucky University engineering professor Matt Dettman, part of a team brought in to assess the damage and the stability of the surrounding area.

Six of the cars were owned by the museum and two — a 1993 ZR-1 Spyder and a 2009 ZR1 Blue Devil — were on loan from General Motors, said museum spokeswoman Katie Frassinelli.

The other cars damaged were a 1962 black Corvette, a 1984 PPG Pace Car, a 1992 White 1 Millionth Corvette, a 1993 Ruby Red 40th Anniversary Corvette, a 2001 Mallett Hammer Z06 Corvette and a 2009 white 1.5 Millionth Corvette.

Bowling Green city spokeswoman Kim Lancaster said the hole opened up at about 5:40 a.m. CST Wednesday, setting off an alarm and a call to the fire department. Frassinelli said no one was in the museum at the time.
The hole opened in part of the museum’s domed section, and that area will remain closed. That’s an original part of the facility that was completed in 1994. The fire department estimated the hole to be about 40 feet across and 25 to 30 feet deep.

Pictures of the sinkhole showed a collapsed section of floor with multiple cars visible inside the hole. A few feet away, other Corvettes sit undamaged and undisturbed.

“It’s certainly a sad day here,” said museum executive director Wendell Strode.

Frassinelli said the rest of the museum was open Wednesday. Visitors trickled into the museum, some unaware that the main exhibit area was closed.

That’s a whole lot of money just to throw down a hole,” said Alida Kriete, who stopped with her family on their way back home in Indiana after a vacation to the Gulf Coast.

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